Pop Filters?

Pop Filters?
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Ok, I know this is going to sound like weird gear acquisition syndrome to many. But I’m always tweaking those last bits of the chain.

So now looking to add a good, I mean really good pop filter. So has anyone had any experience using or looked at the high end filters?

Pauley Ton’s Superscreen
Pete’s Place Audio Blast Pad
JZ Microphones Pop Filter

Not high end per se, but I seem to generate enough plosive power to break any recording. At a certain moment I had two pop filters on my Rode NT1a. One was the pop filter that was built into the cradle, and then I attached a second decent filter to the stand and put that in front of the other filter. It looked ridiculous.

I have since got a Rode PodMic, which apparently has a built in pop filter. I think the biggest difference for me is putting the mic at an angle, and to the side of my mouth rather than the straight ahead approach I used to take recording my voice. It’s helped clear up my sledgehammer consonants big time.

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I think a really good pop filter is one that works really well - for you. :slightly_smiling_face: You can use multiple layers of nylon, or even a thin sock or a pencil/sharpie rubber-banded in front of the capsule. Or you can spend a ton of money and cross your fingers. I do have a Stedman I like best out of my collection, but it’s probably a midrange price point. Functionality, such as bulkiness or fit could be a consideration, so look at all relevant factors.

This is great advice, and really the first things to try. Control or manage the voice and air flow before applying a tool, when possible. You can even train yourself to reduce plosives such as P, B, T, G, K. It takes some work and some practice, but is a great way to be more conscious of your vocal presentation and habits.

I’ve not tried any expensive filters, let us know what you discover! I had a cheap one break for no reason. I like reliable stuff.

I’m not a whole lot of help being that I only use cheap pop filters, but I can say that a dual layer nylon pop filter works infinitely better than a single layer nylon pop filter.

And I love cheap pop filters. No matter how sturdy one is, my kids will find a way to break them anyway.

I have cheap made in China pop filter. It does the job just fine. I think I paid 5 bucks for it.

I have a Samson PS-01 - I think I got it bundled with a Tascam 2488 Stand Alone recorder, a pair of Behringer Truth 82030A Monitors, and a Samson CO1 mic way back in 2006! I gave away the Tascam to a friend, but I still have everything else - use the pop filter all the time! (before that it was a pair of panty-hose stretched over a mangled metal coathanger!)

I make mine out of embroidery hoops and use any acoustically transparent materials I have laying around. Old speaker cloth or nylons work well. I can make a dozen for under $20 and double stack them on singers who are plosive.

Edit: Yes, I do own purchased pop filters, but do not find them anymore effective than the DIY ones.

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So I went with the JZ Microphones Pop Filter.

With the way it is designed in the center there is at least a 1 inch space to catch more air. It also means even if the vocalist eats the filter, they are at least far enough away that on mics where proximity is an issue you can kept them far enough away.

I may be overanalyzing it, but I feel like little pop filter this was a massive improvement to my sound. I really hadn’t been expecting much. I highly recommend it.

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I got mine from a box of cereal…
It’s one of those ‘flexible frisbee’ type of toys. Add wire, a paper-clip, a clothes-pin and some hot-glue and viola!

While I’m sure it’s not professional grade, it works well enough for my silly little projects. :smiley:
Don’t tell my grandson!

Everyone stay safe.

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Here’s one I made a few years ago. It was specifically for a Zoom H2 on a microphone stand. It’s made of a pair of my wife’s old tights, and some aluminium carpet strips. Worked amazingly well!

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