Darth Fader AI takes Drum Kit 101

“The Future of Music” … which I hope makes you cringe. :joy: This puts all “drummer jokes” to shame :clown_face:, at least those drummers were human …

Please take the pledge with me: “All music that I make and proliferate will be human made or human controlled music. No AI or robot music substitutes will be employed to propel humanity into a machine-laden technocratic hell.” :slightly_smiling_face: #MusicWithAPulseAndASoul
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Ha ha Stan. Perfect for a senior citizen concert. BTW I can play those two chords.

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To be fair, that’s about how I would sound on the drums :man_shrugging:

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Let’s show “Bot Boy” how it’s really done! :grin:
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On the other hand, there is Pat Metheny - He’s been playing with a robot orchestra for the past 15 years or so:

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I don’t know about talent levels, but i used to really like Nick Fleetwood’s expressions as he got into his songs…whose surname was merged with that of the group’s bassist John “Mac” McVie to form the name of the band

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I employ a slightly different logic. If an AI can make better music than I can, I quit and they can have my job (if they can do it) :imp: #Kobayashi Maru

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Interesting, I hadn’t heard of this Orchestrion Project before. From the context of the video description it sounds like this equipment is set up in a static location and he performed with it that one time. Of course, I may be missing a wider context.

I understand people are going to experiment with such things, push the envelope, gauge the audience reactions, etc. I suppose as a novelty and a historical footnote it has its place. I tend to think it unlikely to catch on in any popular way, but that remains to be seen.

Definitely one of the “human elements” that would be hard for machines to replicate. Which is directly related to my overarching theme of music being by humans and for humans. Let the robots sweep the floors and take out the trash. :grin: I don’t consider myself some kind of ‘purist’ - music technology has been very nice to incorporate in numerous ways, including synthesizers, MIDI, and full digital immersion. But as with all ethical dilemmas, you have to draw a line somewhere. All of our modern toys are tending to take us down the slippery slope of handing our power over to the machines. All roads eventually have Stop Signs. :wink:

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But isn’t ‘better’ subjective? What criteria might we use to draw such conclusions? Futurists frequently map out a dystopian scenario where all the jobs are given to machines, and humans become unnecessary (en masse at least) and superfluous. It’s a philosophical Pandora’s Box of sorts, that warrants exploring. The choice should be up to us, collectively, what we want our world to look like. That’s why I suggest people look into this and make their voice heard.

Whether or not there’s a group of overlords that controls everything in this world (more likely than not IMO), it would be foolish to let them drag us to and over the technological cliff of no return. #StarTrekTOSTheUltimateComputer

The no-win scenario. Except one man flipped the script. Humans win. :slightly_smiling_face:

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I’m surprised I hadn’t seen this before! Dang!

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The absolute precision of Neil Peart is not likely ever going to be duplicated in our lifetime. That’s a once in a generation player right there. He demanded so much from himself and it showed. Never stopped practicing. Never stopped learning.

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He plays better than I do. The up side is there is no “i"m leaving the band because it’s going in a direction that I don’t like” kind of things going on.

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Hahaha! Solid point!