Automated volume swells preferably in Studio One

Automated volume swells preferably in Studio One
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#1

Hi all,
I am using a Boss GT-10 guitar patch that takes basically the attack off from a guitar stroke.
It is not a 100% hit and essentially I want to try and do the same thing automatically (hopefully) in my DAW, which is Studio One.
It is essentially the same effect as riding the volume knob on a guitar, like a cello or string section type of thing. Right now I have to automate by hand but was wondering if somehow I can create this automatically?
Maybe double the track and push one a little forward in time and side chain noise gate to it? But it will be abrupt, it needs to be smooth volume swell…

Any ideas?


#2

I know in Logic we can use the Enveloper plugin to create that violin style of tone. Is there a similar plugin in Studio One?


#3

Maybe use a transient design plugin? Or is that not enough of an attack reduction?


#4

Since you mentioned that it appears there are 2 that I found:

https://www.pluginboutique.com/product/2-Effects/63-Envelope-Shaper/1280-VolumeShaper-5

https://www.pluginboutique.com/product/2-Effects/63-Envelope-Shaper/117-MWaveShaperMB

Both sidechained and can do swells apparently. Maybe I’ll watch a demo. The Melda one (2nd link) looks more passable as I cna get the grasp on it faster :slight_smile:


#5

Actually the Melda one is free:

http://www.meldaproduction.com/MWaveShaper

The opening first few notes of this video are actually exactly the effect I am after :slight_smile:


#6

The technique it sounds like you might be after are similar to the over-the-top swells and mod effects that are popular right now in ambient/etherial modern church music. If this is the case, those guys typically have a signal chain that’s Delay -> Volume -> Verb -> Delay -> Volume…so one volume pedal cuts off the attack while the second volume pedal simultaneously allows the tail of the verbs to continue feeding into the amp without just killing the wet signal. This can be done with a volume knob, but every guitarist I know prefers to manage it with a second volume pedal, since there’s seemingly no limit to the amount of pedals church guitarists insists in putting on their boards lol.

Not really. When I record ambient guitars that are basically the equivalent to keyboard pads in roll and function, this gets printed at the source. If I had to do, and I wanted to build this kind of signal chain infront of DAW sims, I would probably go guitar -> Ernie Ball Volume Pedal -> Di -> Converter -> Pro Tools -> DAW then build up the processing chain in Scuffham.

I think you’re gonna have to do this by hand.


#7

That’s a good thought…but it seems that most transient designers don’t have a long enough time setting on the attack.

If you absolutely have to do this with a plug, I agree, and I would start by experimenting with envelope shaping plugins myself. As @Aef mentioned, a transient designer is technically an envelope shaper, but its designed to focus on only the 100ns to say…200ms range of a source.


#8

"mod effects that are popular right now in ambient/etherial modern church music."

:slight_smile:

If that’s the case I might burst in flames, the track opens with the christian friendly stanza, penned by yours truly:

“some are born to darkness, others addicted to pain,
let the blood on your hands,be washed away by the falling rain”

I did track something usable and automated by hand, after 3-4 passes of automation riding a mouse :slight_smile:
I have the effect in Boss GT-10 but the swells are different time wise so I’ll play around with the transient designer.

What I ended up recording was Boss GT-10 with its volume pedal into the DAW, then added speaker IR to it since I don’t like the “cabs” in the Boss GT-10, but the amps are fine, then bussed the sound L and R with 2 auxes that I drenched in delay, then fed everything to a common output (all 3 - original track and 2 delay tracks) that I also drenched in delay and verb.

Still a bit too much attack for my taste.