Anyone on Studio One make their own IRs?

Anyone on Studio One make their own IRs?
0

#1

Right now I have a great reverb chamber type of a room as I am in the middle of remodeling parts of the house. Laid down new floor and it has very nice springy reverb that I think I might want to capture.
So, has anyone done this in Studio One? I have version 2 Producer which I believe has the capability.
…or if you can think of another way to do it, that’s fine as well.


#2

Never tried it. Following!


#3

Nope, but here you go… Hopefully v2 works the same as v3. There are some FREE IRs at the end of the article too. :+1:


#4

I found this in the PreSonus forum.

Too bad now that I have to take out my studio monitors all the way from one room to the other but I will do this as the room sounds great right now.

Anyone know how you can do IRs outside of S1 as well? I’ve read a few articles and from what I understood I need a full sweep of the audio spectrum sound file and then I can record back into anything, Audacity even. I guess now the question is where to get the tone generated file?

It would be nice to be able to do it not only within S1 for some of our poorer brethren that are on Reaper :slight_smile:

Found this site:


maybe they have anything that can be used?


#5

Great thread guys!! I’m super pumped to hear the results!


#6

Don’t want to put a downer on this - but it would have to be a Huge And Stellar room for me to even bother doing this.

Actually, the last one I recorded drums in was prob. 60 or 70 feet long and I still didnt bother.

Maybe if you wanted SPECIAL SOUNDING storage / warehouse sized spaces… I dunno, will follow this with interest, regardless.

TBH, I just put MICS IN THE ROOM, while the drums are playing. Im barely interested in reverb IR, so probably still a luddite :slight_smile:


#7

There are lots of small rooms that sound good. It’s just more common to have small rooms that don’t sound good. In fact, a good sounding small room can be pretty awesome.

Also, it’s just fun to learn how to make IRs.


#8

If it turns out good I’d rather use this than something that came canned from some “audio guru”.
We’ll see how it turns out, I’d be happy to share.


#9

I’ve read somewhere that you can pop a balloon while recording the sound and get a decent impulse response file from that. (or other ‘bang’ sound like a gunshot for example). Sounds like it should work. Haven’t tried it myself, though…

I’m using Reaper: stock plugin ReaVerb is an IR generation plugin.


#10

You can do the balloon thing, but the balloon will impact a sound on the tone of the impulse. Also, you are more likely to run into more nose issues by using a single impulse sound.

By using a swept sine wave, you get much better nose performance. But you have to have our make the right software to do it. The speaker you use will also impart a tone on the impulse, and you have to be sure not to distort the speaker as well because it will cause funky artifacts in your impulse


#11

Out of interest - what if you make an IR using a snare drum… and also an IR using a kick drum etc. etc.

Then make a big library of sounds SPECIFICALLY made for the purpose to replicate room mics more accurately.

Hmmm, did I just say all that out loud? :wink: I want 20% if any of you steal that idea…


#12

What do you mean by “make an IR using a snare drum”? Do you mean hitting the snare and using that as an impulse? I could be interesting, but it certainly wouldn’t replicate room mics accurately.

You can easily load a snare sample into an IR reverb and see what it sounds like. I’ve tried it with cymbals, and it was far less usable than I had hoped it would be.


#13

Why not just sample the room and get it over with, no reason to sample every drum in that room???


#14

What kind of software would you need for this? Are there any free tools?
Thx for your input!


#15

well, Boz says there is a trace of the source, and that seems totally logical to me. And when I addd samples to real drums, I always cut the front off anyway, as Im only looking for the ambient part of the sound anyway.

There is the difference between a reverb (from a close mic) and a distant mic with the sound diffused in a room.

Its just that there are no specific reverbs out there, made from different things eg. a door slamming, a drum hit etc.

Just thinking out loud :thinking:


#16

yeah, kinda exactly like that :wink: Now if there was a plugin that made a close mic sound like it was further away. That would be cool too, and combine that with real reverb tails from sampled drums. You could add some ‘crush’ type compression in there… maybe an HPF and LPF a delay.

And I havent even had coffee yet :sunglasses:


#17

Depends on what you use, from what I’ve read Kemper and AxeFx have some built in software that sends a “beep” type of signal on all frequencies on your rig and captures it back. Same approach is valid in Studio One, and some of the other DAWs.
I am thinking as long as you have the right frequency wave to run thru your rig, you don’t really need specialist software for it and can even use something like Audacity.

In my case I am on Studio One and have the IR capture plugin built into my version (Producer).