A friend got signed with a Grammy winning composer :)

A friend got signed with a Grammy winning composer :)
0

A really talented good friend of mine (Shashwat Singh) got signed with AR Rahman (Slumdog Millionaire), the grammy winning composer. His voice is the lead vocals in this song :slight_smile:

Let me know how this sounds !

7 Likes

Sounds fantastic! I was a big fan of Slumdog Millionaire’s sound track. I have a few friends in the Indian music industry, there are lots of really talented people there.

1 Like

What a great story to share… lovely singing!!!

1 Like

Congratulations to your friend. This song is really pleasant sounding and soothing. Your friend’s voice has a nice tone and the production is excellent!

1 Like

It sounds really good, which I’m sure is no surprise. It’s not a genre I’m familiar with though, so I was just listening for discovery and enjoyment. This is from India it looks like, but Google Translate seems to think the language is Filipino (Tagalog?). I would appreciate more background on the story, and certainly English lyrics (or a lyric sheet Google could try to translate) to better understand the story. It’s clearly a love story, but since the culture and language are a bit exotic I’m sure I’m missing lots of subtleties.

Not really being familiar with AR Rahman (though I did see SDM years ago), I found this documentary interesting. Of course I haven’t watched the whole thing yet, but for anyone else that wants to take a deeper dive, the guy is apparently the Hans Zimmer of India.
.

1 Like

I found this and it helped things make a little more sense. The movie is “99 Songs”, and that song is from the soundtrack apparently. If you open this video on YouTube and enable Subtitles/CC you can see English subscript. Near the end the lady says to the kid “Music is the last bit of magic in this world.” Now, that one really got me. :cupid:
.


.
Here’s even more info. And it could be the language is Tamil (?), which I know virtually nothing about except that would be South India.
.
1 Like

The language is Hindi, but India has a mix of several languages based on which part you travel to. When I was there ‘exploring’ myself like the Beatles lol, I made several friends in each parts. I performed at some weddings. The North speaks Hindi and the South speaks Tamil. There are 4 other main languages in the East and the West.
Shashwat, the lead singer who is now AR Rahman’s go-to guy for Bollywood songs, is a great composer himself. We go ways back and have composed things together. Good to see him rise to fame. I am itching to travel there again and meet the gang again… some day!

he is, I have only met him once, long time ago. He was not as famous then but his composing genius had impressed me several times over.

1 Like

Thanks for the info, definitely an education. My first guess was Hindi just by the circumstances but I didn’t think it looked like Hindi. In retrospect, I guess I know very little about Hindi. I knew the North and South part, and many dialects are present, but that’s really a smorgasbord. I am familiar with some Sanskrit from yoga and Vedanta, but apparently that’s more different from Hindi than I realized (perhaps what thousands of years can do to culture and language).

1 Like

Hey Michelle, this sounds excellent! There is some serious low end happening here, but it sounds really super controlled. Your friend has an amazing voice, and the production is superb. Did you have any involvement in it?

1 Like

Grew up speaking Hindi and Punjabi - The song is beautiful and I consider myself lucky for being able to understand it without subtitles!

A R Rahman is a hero of sorts to us Indians, not just the fact he makes music which seemingly is accepted in India and Hollywood, but also for the amazing amount of good he does.

And yes, India has a silly number of languages and once you throw in the dialects it’s gets even sillier. Hindi is spoken all the way up to the north where something funny happens around the Tibet and Nepal area. In the north west you get Punjab (where my family lived) and hence we speak Punjabi. Cross the border and you get to Pakistan where they speak Urdu, which can be understood by Hindi speakers. On the other side you have Bangladesh, where they speak Bengali, and Gujarat where they speak Gujarati. Go southward and all bets are off. You get so many dialects of Hindi that it is incompressible to anyone other than locals. Then keep going south and you’ll hit Tamil, Marathi, Malayalam, Kanada, Telegu all with their own local dialects. Insanity. My local area has a number of these Indians living and working, and when we pick up our kids from school you can see the look of utter confusion on our faces as we all realise that no two people in the group speak a common language. So English is what we end up with.

As far as Rahman’s music goes, it’s top notch in every way. He actually got famous India wide for the soundtrack to the film Bombay, and took a lot of flack because he decided to bypass the traditional film soundtrack orchestras and play the orchestral parts on synths. His discography is something to behold and you’ll often her one of his tracks playing in my house!

Some listening:

2 Likes

nominal, mainly as giving direct feedback (about the low end as you have so aptly noticed), but not actually composing anything for it.

1 Like

He also has a great voice. I heard him sing back before he changed his name from Duleep I think? To Rahman. He used to go by both names for a while. Then the Rahman name really stuck with people. Then I never heard him sing again. Wish he would sing again.

It’s ironic - his birth name is Dilip Kumar - which happens to be the name of one of the most famous and highly regarded Indian actors of all time. It’s like being called Clint Eastwood or Katherine Hepburn and trying to distinguish yourself from your namesakes. But yes, he has a truly brilliant voice

1 Like